Tag Archives: national gallery

Returning to my Sekuru

20 Jul

The Shona belief of the word sekuru in stone

The mening of the word sekuru

In the Shona language the word sekuru has different meanings. Basically it is a word which defines the relationship between members of a family. Besides that, the word is also used for expressing strangers, like an elderly man showing a kind of respect.
In families the word sekuru is used for the paternal or maternal grandfather. This is understandable, these are elderly people. When you are female it is also used for the brother of the mother (uncle) and for his son. This is not so understandable, because even the uncle is treated as a husband. The wife of the uncle is your rival. If you are a male the uncle is your rival, because his wife is treated as your wife. How it will function in practice, I don’t know.

The maternal uncle is also regarded to become a replacement for the mother. He can be asked for advise, when you have a problem, that reaches out of the competence of the mother. That is also a task for the uncle, when the maternal grandfather dies and the eldest sekuru has to take over his role. In that case the mother will call him father.

The function of the sekuru in the Shona culture seems to be very complex and the urge probably has a reason. If you want to read more about the Shona sekuru-relationship, read the article of Chipo Musikavanhu on her blog
http://www.letstalkafrican.blogspot.nl/2013/07/the-shona-peoples-sekuru-relationship.html.

Is sekuru a theme in the Shona stone sculpture movement?

Did the Shona sculptors from the first generation use the theme sekuru within the carving of theirs sculptures? I think it was not a usable theme for the sculptors. I detected only two sculptors, who carved sculptures in relation to the theme sekuru, i.e. the late Joseph Ndandarika and Sylvester Mubayi, two great sculptors of the first generation.

Joseph Ndandarika

Let us start with Joseph Ndandarika. In 1977 he carved a sculpture, which he called: The Midzumu Bull (see picture 1)

Unnamed image (97)
Fig. 1 The Midzumu Bull, sculpted by Joseph Ndandarika, 1977

midzumu is an ancestral spirit in Shona belief. When a sekuru (elder) had died, his spirit would be passed over to a young bull. The spirit would be kept inside the bull, for two years old. After that the bull  was killed. The spirit of the sekuru is then released and united with the spirits of his ancestors.

Joseph Ndandarika realised toexpose this story in one stone. When you look at the figures behind the bull, the outer left one holds the pot, in which the spirit was kept. The middle figures are blowing the spirit into the bull. The outer right figure holds the club to kill the bull afterwards. It is a nice sculpture in green springstone. The sculpture refers to the spirit of the sekuru.

Joseph Ndandarika was born in 1940 from a Malawian father and a Shona mother. His paternal Malawian grandfather had migrated to Zimbabwe long before that and became a highly respected n’anga (witch doctor). Joseph was apprenticed to become a witch doctor too. He spent some time as a neophyte trained to become a young traditional healer (Monda, April 2015). But he converted to Catholicism and went to the Serima Mission. There he joined Father John Groeber who was building a mission and  a church. Father Groeber taught youngsters  painting and sculpture for the decoration of the church. When the church was finished, Joseph Ndandarika went back to his parents in Mutare.
In 1959 Joseph Ndandarika joined the Workshop School of the National Gallery, first for painting, clay-modelling and carving in wood. In 1960 he started with sculpting in stone, when he met Joram Mariga in Nyanga. He became a well-known sculptor.

Joy Kuhn wrote in her book ‘Myth and Magic’ (1978) that she had an interview with Joseph Ndandarika. He told her his beliefs when he was sculpting in his early days. He referred to his Malawian grandfather, the n’anga, and told herthat the grandfather had a story:
“He used to go home to Malawi in ten minutes time to fetch a fish from there (…).  He went on  the bird, the manjojo bird. That bird was magic and my grandfather could ride on him”.
And Joseph sculpted an old man with a pointed head , riding on a bird (1978:83).

Joseph Ndandarika had a profound respect for his sekuru.

Sylvester Mubayi

Sylvester Mubayi made a sculpture in 1997, which he called: ‘Returning to my Sekuru’ (see Fig. 2). It is a nice sculture in springstone, representing a man with a child. This is a clear reference to the sekuru. Why Sylvester Mubayi used this theme is unknown, but there could be a reason, which I will explain later.

sekuru-4
Fig. 2 Returning to my Sekuru, sculpted by Sylvester Mubayi, 1997 (Joosten, 2001:275)

Sylvester Mubayi was born in 1942 in the Chiotah reserve near Marondera in the North Eastern Zimbabwe. In 1966 he was looking for a job and he met Tom Blomefield, who just had started with the Tengegenenge Sculptor Community. He joined Tom Blomefield and became one of the leading sculptors in Tengengenge. But not for long. In 1968 he went to the Workshop School in Harare. The Workshop School was founded by Frank McEwen, director of the Rhodes National Gallery.

Frank McEwen made Sylvester Mubayi his leading sculptor. He rated him as a greater sculptor than Henri Moore (Zilberg, 2006:n.p.).

After Independence in 1988 Sylvester Mubayi had a One Man Exhibition in the Francis Kyle Gallery in London. In a review of this exhibition Michael Sheperd of the Sunday Telegraph wrote as follows:

“Now that Henri Moore is dead, who is the greatest living stone sculptor? When I were to choose, I would choose from three Zimbabwean sculptors – Sylvester Mubayi, Nicholas Mukomberanwa and Joseph Ndandarika” (Mawdsley, 1997).

Also in 1991 The Guardian (U.K.) voted Sylvester Mubayi as one of the top 10 sculptors in the world (Monda, June 2015).

Did Sylvester Mubayi create the sculpture ‘Returning to my Sekuru’ after a statement, made by Joseph Ndandarika 

Joseph Ndandarika was a well-known sculptor and became a wealthy man.Tony Monda wrote that he met Joseph Ndandarika in 1989 for an interview and the latter spoke to him with the words: “I am the great Shona sculptor Ndandarika – who are you”? (Monda, April 2015). That was two years before his death. Joseph Ndandarika died tragically in 1991, barely 50 years old.

Just before his death, he is alleged to have spoken these words:

I am now wealthy and famous, but I am dying.

At last my spirits call me back to my remote childhood village.

There my sekuru receives me  with such compassion and gentleness,

that I weep on his lap.

Could these words have been the reason for Sylvester Mubayi to sculpt the sculpture ‘Returning to my Sekuru’ in 1997? It seems to be a fact, a child on the lap of an old man.

Someone had the knowledge of this, then he or she puts the words of Joseph Ndandarika and the stone of Sylvester Mubayi together in a picture (see Fig.3).

sekuru-3

Fig. 3 Returning to my Sekuru

This closes the circle. Two great sculptors expressed their respect for the sekuru, the paternal grandfather, in words and stone.

Maastricht, July 2015
Pierre Swillens

Cited references:

Joosten, Ben
2001 Sculptors from Zimbabwe, the first generation, Galerie de Strang
Dodewaard The Netherlands

Kuhn, Joy
1978 Myth and Magic, The Art of the Shona of Zimbabwe., Don Nelson, Cape Town

Mawdsley, Joceline
1997 Chapungu: The Stone Sculptures of Zimbabwe, Harare: Chapungu

Monda, Tony
April 2015 Joseph Ndandarika – (1940-1991) … the n’anga who became a famous shona sculptor
June 2015 The last lion of Zimbabwe stone sculpture

Musikavanhu, Chipo
July 2015 THE SHONA PEOPLE’S RELATIONSHIP EXPLAINED

Zilberg, Jonathan
2006 The Frank McEwen Collection of Shona Sculptures in the British Museum

Advertenties

Sculptors from Zimbabwe (deel 3)

10 Aug

the first generation,

een bijzondere ontmoeting met een bijzondere man

Inleiding

Als je de beeldentuin Maastricht-Heerdeberg bezoekt, dan liggen de verhalen voor het oprapen. Zo ook op 5 augustus jl. Wij kochten bij José twee mooie beeldjes. José vertelde, dat de kunstenaar voor de beeldjes kobalt steen had gebruikt, een zeldzame steen met mooie kleurschakeringen.
Bovendien vertelde ze, dat de kunstenaar zelf op de beeldentuin aanwezig was.  Zijn naam is Edward Chiwawa, een van de nog weinig levende kunstenaars, die worden aangeduid als behorend tot ‘the first generation’ van Zimbabwaanse beeldhouwers in steen. Een ontmoeting met hem was te arrangeren, een kans die wij ons niet voorbij lieten gaan.

Ontmoeting met Edward Chiwawa

Foto A
Poseren met Edward Chiwawa
XIMG_8412-cs2a

Een bereidwillige medewerkster van de beeldentuin zorgde er voor, dat Edward Chiwawa met ons op de foto ging.  Hij moest het kappen van een beeld even onderbreken. Met een leeftijd van 79 jaar kapt hij nog ruim 13 uur per dag.

Een beetje ‘lullige’ foto. Twee oudjes, die triomfantelijk poseren met hun ‘behaalde’ trofee en een kunstenaar, die berustend kijkt: ‘moet ik weer op de foto’.
Ook lullig vind ik, dat ik het grootste beeldje mag vasthouden. Maar zeg eens eerlijk, met dat kleine beeldje zou nog lulliger geweest zijn.
Voor alle duidelijkheid Edward is met zijn 79 jaar de jongste op de foto (zie foto A).

Biografie van Edward Chiwawa 

Mijn voornaamste bron is Sculptors from Zimbabwe, geschreven door Ben Joosten. 

Edward Chiwawa is in 1935 geboren in Guruve (Zimbabwe).  Hij behoort tot de Shona groep en wel tot de Korekore stam.
Hij maakte kennis met het beeldhouwen in steen via zijn neef Henry Munyaradzi, een bekend beeldhouwer in steen.

Foto B

Edward Chiwawa aan het kappen in de beeldentuin

XIMG_8408-cs2a

Edward Chiwawa, voornamelijk werkzaam als landarbeider en korvenvlechter, besloot om in 1970 ook te beginnen met beeldhouwen in steen. Zijn leermeester was Wilson Chakawa.
Hij werkte een aantal jaren in Tengengenge, maar vertrok toen weer naar zijn geboorteplaats Guruve. Om zijn beelden onder de aandacht van kopers en galeriehouders te brengen, bracht hij zijn beelden naar een stand in Tengenenge.

In 1979 gedurende de Bevrijdingsoorlog in het toenmalige Rhodesië werd het te gevaarlijk in Guruve en ging Tengenenge zelfs dicht.  Met meerdere kunstenaars sloot Edward Chiwawa zich aan bij Tom Blomefield in Harare. Na de oorlog keerde Edward Chiwawa niet terug naar Guruve. Hij woont nu in Chitungwize, ten zuiden van Harare.

Edward Chiwawa slaagde er wel in om zijn beelden geplaatst te krijgen op ‘exhibitions’, zoals London (1981), Frankfurt (1985), Sydney (1986), Melbourne (1987), Rome (1987), Parijs (1987), Zwitserland en de USA in 1986. In 1986 won hij in Budapest de 1e prijs op de ‘7th International Small Sculpture Exhibition’.
Veel van zijn werken maken een permanent deel uit van de collecties van de National Gallery en het Chapunga Sculpture Park in Harare (Zimbabwe), de collectie van Manfred Kuhnigk in Bad Soden (Duitsland), het Afrika Museum in Berg en Dal en de collectie van Joseph Baerber in Zwitserland (bron: Franck MCEwen, THE AFRICAN WORKSHOP SCHOOL Rhodesia n.d.).

Werken van Edward Chiwawa

man_in_the n'jeelja_bush

In het verhaal van de Franck MCEwen school wordt het beeld van Edward Chiwawa met de moeilijke titel ‘Man in the N’Jeelja Bush’ genoemd als een mooi beeld. Het beeld is abstract, en gemaakt van serpentijnsteen. Het heeft afgeronde gladde kanten, geometrisch lijnenspel van de armen en het typische Edward Chiwawa gezicht.

Alle gezichten, man of vrouw, worden door Edward Chiwawa minimalistisch voorgesteld. De ogen bestaan uit twee concentrische cirkels, de neus is hoekig en plat, de mond vaak een streep. De beelden met enkel een gezicht bracht hij in relatie tot de maan, zoals ‘Moon Head’ of tot de zon zoals bijvoorbeeld in Rising Sun Head.’
Het beste voorbeeld hiervan kan ik geven door een foto te plaatsen van de door ons verkregen beeldjes van Edward Chiwawa. Op onze vraag hoe hij de beeldjes noemde, zei hij ‘Moon Head’.  Wij hebben hem helaas niet gevraagd of de beeldjes met elkaar verband hielden. Het grootste beeldje heeft hij duidelijk gesigneerd met E Chiwawa, het kleine niet. Misschien hoort het bij het grotere, zoiets als ‘Moeder en Dochter’ of ‘Vader en Zoon’. Het geslacht van het gezicht is moeilijk af te leiden, ofschoon op internet iemand beweert, dat het vrouwelijke trekken heeft.

Wel wil ik nog wijzen op de steen, een soort cobalt steen. met een mooie kleurschakering. Bij strijklicht komt er een paarse gloed over. Edward Chiwawa hecht veel waarde aan de steen. Hij schijnt eens gezegd te hebben: “De steen moet voor zichzelf spreken”.

Foto C
Dubbele ‘Moon Heads’\XIMG_8416-cs2-irf-cs2a
Voor een verdere indruk van Edward Chiwawas werk, zie de fotogalerij.

Pierre Swillens

Fotogalerij

Sculptors from Zimbabwe (deel 2)

4 Aug

the first generation

Eerbetoon aan Bernard Matemera

Inleiding

In mijn vorige blog bracht ik naar voren, dat in de Beeldentuin Maastrich-Heerdeberg  een beeld staat, gebeeldhouwd door Bernard Matemera en dat als een zelfportret moest worden beschouwd. In deze blog wil ik iets meer vertellen over Bernard Matemera.
Als bron gebruik ik hiervoor het reeds eerder genoemde boek ‘Sculptors from Zimbabwe’, geschreven door Ben Joosten.

Tom Blomefield

blomefield-5Voor dat ik over Bernard Matemera begin, moet ik eerst iemand anders noemen en dat is Tom Blomefield. Deze man heeft ontzettend veel betekend voor de kunstenaars van Zimbabwe en het beeldhouwen in steen.
Tom Blomefield is in 1926 geboren in Johannesburg (Zuid-Afrika). In 1948 kwam hij naar Zimbabwe en een jaar later trouwde hij met een dochter uit een rijke familie van tabaksplanters.
Met behulp van zijn schoonfamilie kocht hij een flinke lap grond en verbouwde hierop een tabaksplantage.
Hij noemde zijn gebied Tengenenge naar een riviertje, dat naast zijn grondgebied stroomde. Tengengenge heeft meer betekenissen, maar een ervan is “Beginning of the beginning”.
Tengenenge zou door de bemoeienissen van Tom Blomefield een wereldwijd begrip worden binnen de beeldhouwkunst van Zimbabwe.

Tom Blomefield, zoon van een kunstenares, was niet begeesterd door het werk op de tabaksplantage en toen het slechter ging met de plantage, zocht hij naar een andere bron van inkomsten. Hij wist dat op zijn grondstuk serpentijnsteen voorhanden was, dat zich makkelijk leende om te worden bewerkt. Hij ontmoette in 1966 een jonge Zimbabwaanse kunstenaar Christen Chakanyuka, die elders een opleiding had genoten tot beeldhouwer in steen. Met hem als leermeester begon Tom Blomefield met het beeldhouwen in steen.

blomefield-3
Omdat Blomefield zag, dat er geld mee te verdienen was, moedigde hij zijn arbeiders aan om te bekijken of ze ook aanleg hadden voor beeldhouwen in steen. Een ervan was Bernard Matemera, voorman op zijn tabaksplantage. Bernard Matemera had aanleg en produceerde al snel beelden, die werden verkocht.
Het succes trok meer mensen aan en Tom Blomefield stichtte de Tengenenge Sculpture Community, Pvt Ltd. Dit was het begin van een kunstenaarsgemeenschap, waarin de kunstenaars gedijden en in hun levensonderhoud konden voorzien. Dit alles volgens het zakelijk inzicht en het enthousiasme van Tom Blomefield.

Bernard Matemera

Zoals gezegd een van die kunstenaars van het eerste uur was Bernard Matemera, geboren in 1946 in Guruve matemera-8a(Zimbabwe). Hij genoot vier jaar lagere school. Hij moest in zijn vrije tijd het vee bewaken. Tijdens die werkzaamheden beoefende hij houtsnijkunst en klei-modellering.
In 1963 kwam hij naar Tengenenge om daar tewerk worden gesteld als bestuurder van een tractor op de tabaksplantages. Hij werkte ook voor Tom Blomefield
In 1966 vroeg Tom Blomefield hem of hij tot de kunstenaars gemeenschap Tengenenge wilde toetreden. Bernard Matemera had talent. Hij maakte een beeldje van een schildpad en daarna een van een giraffe. Dit beeldje werd verkocht door de National Gallery en Bernard Matemera ontving hiervoor 14 Pond.
Bernard Matemera ontwikkelde een eigen stijl. Hij behoorde tot de Shona cultuur en sprak een Shona dialect  Opvallend aan zijn beelden is, dat de figuren vaak drie vingers aan een hand en twee tenen aan een voet hadden. Zie o.a. het beeldje dat op de foto aan zijn voeten staat. In zijn stam heerste de antropologische mythe, dat een dergelijk volk in Zambezi bestaan had of nog bestond. Nog heden ten dage leeft in West-Zambezi, dicht bij de Zambezirivie, een geïsoleerde stam de Doma, waaarvan de leden door een genetische mutatie twee tenen aan hun voeten hebben. De drie middelste tenen ontbreken.

Zie ook het volgend beeld Family.

matemera-9a
matemera-10aBernard Matemera gaf toch graag zijn beelden een mythologische betekenis. Zo ook het beeld ‘the man who eat his totem’. In zijn stam kreeg ieder persoon een totem toegewezen. Dat kon zijn door de vader of door een medicijnman. De totem was meestal een dier. Nu was het een wet, dat de persoon zijn  totem niet mocht doden of opeten. Het laatste heeft hetzelfde effect als het eerste.
Nu had volgens Bernard Matemera de man zijn totem (een wildzwijn) opgegeten en nu veranderde zijn hoofd
in een zwijnskop. Helaas ook die van zijn zoontje, want die had kennelijk meegegeten.
Bernard Matemera legt hiermede een  boodschap in zijn beeld. Hij of zij die de wet overtreedt, zal worden gestraft. En dan bedoelt hij niet de wet van de overheid, maar de wet van het volk.

(Deze drie foto’s zijn gescand uit het boek “Sculptors from Zimbabwe” aan de hand van Ben Joosten).

De boodschap dat men zijn totem niet mag doden herhaalt hij in zijn beeld ‘the man changing into a rhino’. Iemand had zijn totem een rinoceros gedood en kreeg een hoorn op zijn hoofd.

Dat het niet zo eenvoudig is om aan zo’n beeld te werken, blijkt uit de volgende foto. Het beeld waar Bernard Matemera aan werkt, noemde hij ‘Rhino Man’. Het is een van zijn eerste werken.

man changing into a rhino-3

Ik wil nog een beeld behandelen, omdat Bernard Matemera dat zo apart vond. Het beeld op de linkerfoto stelt voor ‘Sitting Doma Man’. Over het Doma volk heb ik reeds eerder iets verteld. Het beeld mocht van hem niet worden verkocht en na zijn dood moest het naast zijn graf worden geplaatst. Hij stierf vrij jong en of hij zijn  dood voorvoelde, weet ik niet. Het sierde zijn graf een tiental jaren. Daarna  werd het door de Bernard Matemera Estate  geschonken aan de Rhino Head Gallery.

Naamloos-1

Epiloog

Bernard Matemera was een autodidact. De talenten voor het beeldhouwen in steen had hij vanaf de geboorte.
Bernard Matemera was een Shona en doordrongen van de Shona cultuur.
Bernard Matemera was een van de eersten, aangeduid als the first generation’.
Bernard Matemera was ‘the godfather’ van de Tengenenge kunstenaarsgemeenschap.
Bernard Matemera was een neo-expressionist. Zijn beelden moesten iets voorstellen.
Bernard Matemera zocht in zijn beelden naar het mystieke.
Bernard Matemera zocht in zijn beelden de grenzen op tussen het menselijke en het dierlijke.
Bernard Matemera  was een fenomeen in het beeldhouwen in steen. Hij ging helaas te vroeg heen.

Bernard Matemera werd niet altijd begrepen, maar de erkenning van zijn kunstenaarschap was wereldwijd.
Bernard Matemera was de Picasso onder de beeldhouwers in steen.

Pierre Swillens

Fotogalerij