Tag Archives: fanizani akuda

The man who sculpted twice at a stone

14 Aug

Henry Munyaradzi, sculptor from the first generation

Sculptors from Zimbabwe, the first generation
In 2001 the late Ben Joosten published a book Sculptors from Zimbabwe. This book is a lexicon of the sculptors from the first generation.
Ben Joosten started his research for the book in 1992. He travelled several times to Zimbabwe to speak with the sculptors and to take  pictures of their sculptures. In this way  he met Henry Munyaradzi in 1994 at his home in Ruwa. Henry had just finished a sculpture, which he called: ‘The wedding of the astronauts’ (see Fig. 1).

the_astronaut-3

Fig. 1 The wedding of the astronauts, sculpted by Henry Munyaradzi (Joosten, 2001: 283)

When you observe  the sculpture, you will see that Henry respected the shape of the stone. He carved minimalistic with incisions in geometric figures. His style looks like the works of Paul Klee, the German of whom Henry Munyaradzi has never had heard.
The faces at the bottom resemble the sculpture Spade Head, sculpted by Henry in 1974.

Description of Henry Munyaradzi

Henry Munyaradzi was born in 1931 in Guruve in the North of Zimbabwe. His father was a spirital medium and left the family when Henry was young. That´s why he was raised  in the family of his nephew Edward Chiwawa and attended  no formal education.
In his youth he herded cattle and hunted  small animals with dogs, spears, bows and arrows. As he grew  older he had a job as a blacksmith and later on as a carpenter and a tobacco-grader. After  he became unemployed  he stumbled across the Tengenenge Sculptor Community in 1967 where  he heard the stone carvers. He thought that he was also capable of doing that and when he met Tom Blomefield he was allowed to try carving.
Henry Munyaradzi was entirely self-taught and became a successful sculptor. Already in 1968 the National Gallery bought a sculpture from him for their collection.
In 1975 he left Tengenenge and went to Chitungwiza where his nephew Edward Chiwawa and Fanizani Akuda lived and sculpted. The situation in Tengenenge got too dangerous during the Liberation War.

After Independence Day in 1980 he did not return to Tengenenge. In 1985 he bought a farm in Ruwa, where he sculpted until his death in 1998.

The Astronaut’s Wedding

Surfing on the internet I saw a picture on Flickr with a sculpture from Henry Munyaradzi, which was called: ‘The Astronaut’s Wedding’ and was sculpted in 1983 (see Fig. 2).

the_astronaut-2

Fig. 2 The Astronaut’s Wedding, sculpted by Henry Munyaradzi, 1983.

I saw a creation  with the same shape as the sculpture called: ‘The wedding of the astronauts’, but just sculpted at the reverse side.
The photograph was taken in 2007 at the Missouri Botanic Garden, during the exhibition “Chapungu: Nature, Man and Myth”. In my opinion the sculptures ‘The wedding of the astronauts’ and ‘The astronaut’s wedding’ were made on the same stone.

 A unique three-sided sculpture

In order to be convinced I contacted the Missouri Botanic Garden and one of their employees sent me an e-mail with a picture of  the sculpture with the 1994-side. The description of the sculpture´s title  was ‘The Astronaut’s Wedding’ and the year of completion  was 1983.

The employee wrote:
“Meaning: Married on Earth we now explore space together. Note: This sculpture is a unique 3-sided sculpture. The wedding is depicted on one side with blessings indicated by the birds; the preacher is on the narrow side; and the back depicts the couple in a space capsule exploring the heavens”.

This means she describes the 1994-side as the blessings and the 1983-side as the couple, exploring the space.

Typical questions

  1. What was Henry’s intention to sculpt twice at the same stone?
  2. Why was the 1983-side called ‘The Astronaut’s Wedding’ and the 1994-side ‘The wedding of the astronauts’. Had Henry forgotten the original name?
  3. Was the sculpture the property of Henry during the years 1983 until 1994? In 1985 he moved from Chitungwiza to Ruwa. It is sure that the sculpture completed after 1994 was added to the collection of the Chapungu Sculpture Park in Harare (Joosten, 2001:283).
  4. Was the employee of the Missouri Botanic Garden aware that Henry sculpted twice at the sculpture? She describes the year of completion as 1983.

Epilogue 

The employee of the Missouri Botanic Garden describes the 1994-side as the blessings indicated by the birds. Obviously she interprets the circle with the cross as a bird. It is not known whether  this was  also Henry’s intention.
In 1972 he sculpted a small statue , which he called: ‘The Astronaut’ (see Fig. 3).

 

the_astronaut-4

Fig. 3 The Astronaut, sculpted by Henry Munyaradzi, 1972

On this sculpture the same figure of the circle with the cross is applied. I assume  that Henry sculpted a half-moon and a star on this sculpture. Therefore , I think that Henry misguides the viewer by sculpting stars  on the 1994-side  and not birds. What Henry intended with the 1994-side, we will probably never know because of the fact that he died without giving any written information about the meaning of this work of art.

Maastricht, August 2015

Pierre Swillens

Referenced cite:

Joosten, Ben
2001 Sculptors from Zimbabwe, the first generation. Galerie de Strang, Dodewaard, The Netherlands

 

Advertenties

Sculptors from Zimbabwe (part 1)

5 Mei

My first experience with the study of the Zimbabwean stone sculpture during the period 1950 – 1980

Beeldentuin Maastricht – Heerdeberg

In the neighbourhood of Maastricht in the Netherlands, the city where I live, there is  a sculpture garden, called Beeldentuin Maastricht – Heerdeberg. The owner of this sculpture garden is Mrs. José de Goede, a former auctioneer and assessor of art and antiques. She has a long time experience in exhibiting and selling Zimbabwean stones in galleries. Almost every year she travels to Zimbabwe in order to buy sculptures directly from the sculptors. She knows the sculptor and their families very well and she invites them, like the (late) Bernard Matemera and Edward Chiwawa, to give workshops in her sculpture garden.

The sculpture garden is in the vicinity of a marl quarry. The quarry forms the outline. The sculptures are partly arranged on banks near the border of the quarry and partly in a natural garden (Fig. 1a + 1b).

m_IMG_8244-irf-cs2

Fig. 1a Group of sculptures near the border of the quarry

m_IMG_8260-cs2

Fig. 1b Group of sculptures in a natural garden

 José de Goede is very committed with the sculptors in Zimbabwe. She founded the Bernard Matemera Foundation. With help of this foundation she is building schools for children in Zimbabwe and supports the families of sculptors, who run out of income by occasion.
As I mentioned before, she invites well-known sculptors from Zimbabwe in her sculpture garden to give workshops. Last year she welcomed Edward Chiwawa with his son McCloud and another junior sculptor to teach in her sculpture garden.

Book ‘Sculptors from Zimbabwe’ by the late Ben Joosten

This book is published in 2001 by Galerie de Strang, Dodewaard, the Netherlands, and holds a lexicon of all the sculptors of the first generation.

The lexicon is divided into five sections, with sculptors from the:

– Cyrene Mission, headed by Canon Edward Paterson;
– Serima Mission, headed by Father John Groeber;
– Workshop School in Harare, headed by Frank McEwen;
– Nyanga Group, headed by Joram Mariga;
– Tengenenge Sculptor Community, headed by Tom Blomefield.

 Ben Joosten was a very conscientious man, he got his information on the stands. As far as he managed to research, he mentioned from each sculptor his bibliography , his exhibitions and the collections, as well as where his of her sculptures are saved. So  if you have to look up some information about a sculptor from the first generation , you will find this in the book. Will someone ever write such a book about sculptors of the second generation?

Mrs. José de Goede donated me, as Ambassador of the Beeldentuin Maastricht-Heerdeberg the book of Ben Joosten and from that moment on I started my study of the development of the Zimbabwean stone sculpture in the period 1950 – 1980.
Studying the book of Ben Joosten I questioned myself: “Are there any sculptures of sculptors from the first generation in the Beeeldentuin Maastricht-Heerdebeerg?”

Bernard Matemera

m_Unnamed image (48)

 First of all a sculpture from the late Bernard Matemera. Mrs. José de Goede told me, that Bernard Matemera sculpted twice in her backyard in the Netherlands before his death in 2002. I could not believe that the famous Bernard Matemera, one of the best real Shona sculptors, would sculpt in a backyard in Holland. Mrs. José de Goede assured me that Bernard Matemera was a gentle man, who always kept his word.

Unfortunately he died at a young age (56 years). He was such a remarkable man, that  I will spent more honour to him at a later moment in my stories.
The sculpture from Bernard Matemera in the sculpture garden Beeldentuin Maastricht-Heerdeberg is a self-portrait and for a long time it has been the property of Mrs. José de Goede (Fig. 2)

Fig. 2 Self-portrait, sculpted by Bernard Matemera

If you look at the sculptures from the sculptors of the first generation, then you will see that most of them had a gimmick or a trademark. So didUnnamed image (62) Bernard Matemera. When he sculpted a person, he always sculpted three fingers on each hand and three toes on each foot. That story is not unlikely. I found on the internet that slightly north of Zimbabwe there is an isolated tribe, called the Doma People. Most of them have only two toes, the outer toes. The toes are developed in a V-shape and people called them ostrich-feet. The two toes are caused by a genetic defect.
Bernard Matemera must have been aware  of that and sculpted all his human figures with three fingers and three toes. That is his trademark (Fig. 3).

Fig.3 Family, sculpted by Bernard Matemera (1987)

Fanizani Akuda

Another sculptor from the first generation I  found in the sculpture garden Beeldentuin Maastricht-Heerdeberg was Fanizani Akuda. When Mrs. José de Goede went to Zimbabwe she met Fanizani Akuda and his wife (Fig. 4).

m_Unnamed image (49)Fig. 4 Mrs. José de Goede (right) meets Fanizani Akuda and his wife

Fanizani Akuda always kept his best stones for her, when she met him for buying stones. Unfortunately Fanizani Akuda died on February 5, in 2011.
Fanizane Akuda was born in 1932 in Zambia. In 1946 he went to Zimbabwe for a job. In 1967 he arrived in the Tengenenge Sculptor Community and asked Tom Blomefield for a job. Tom Blomefield gave him the job of digging stones for the sculptors. Some day he asked Fanizani Akuda to try sculpting, but the latter refused because he was afraid that by sculpting small stone splinters would get in his eyes.
After a short time Fanizani Akuda changed his mind and when Tom Blomefield repeated  his offer, he accepted the tools for sculpting. In a short ime he became a successful sculptor (Joosten, 2001:153).

Fanizani Akuda also had a trademark. He had a lot of humour and when he sculpted a person he always sculpted closed eyes. He wanted to illustrate prevention that the person might get  stone splinters in his eyes (fig. 5).

m_IMG_8271-cs2
Fig. 5 Small stones , sculpted by Fanizani Akuda and exhibited in the sculpture garden Beeldentuin Maastricht-Heerdeberg

When Fanizani Akuda grew older he sculpted only small sculptures,  like Whistlers. The mouths of this whistlers were made with a bit and he sculpted blown cheeks (see Fig. 5). I wrote that he had a lot of humour. I read a story he told someone. When you strike with your finger over the mouth of the whistler, then you hear a sound. I tried this with the small whistler in Fig. 5 , but I did not hear a sound. Perhaps I did not strike in the right way.

Edward Chiwawa

Another sculptor from whom you will find sculptures in the sculpture garden Beeldentuin Maastricht – Heerdeberg is Edward Chiwawa. He was  born in Guruve (Zimbabwe) in 1935 and he belongs to the Shona people. He started sculpting in Guruve. He brought his sculptures to  a stand in the Tengenenge Sculptor Community. There was also his four years older nephew Henry Munyaradzi sculpting.  In 1979 the situation in Guruve was dangerous due to the War of Liberation. Edward Chiwawa moved with his family to Harare. He now lives  in Chitungwiza (Joosten, 2001: 175).

I had the opportunity to meet Edward Chiwawa in the sculpture  garden Beeldentuin Maastricht – Heerdeberg, where he sculpted and gave  workshops with his son McCloud (Fig. 6).

m_IMG_8408-cs2

Fig. 6  Edward Chiwawa daily sculpting in the sculpture garden Beeldentuin Maastricht – Heerdeberg

Mrs. José de Goede told me, that every morning at 9.00 am she heard Edward Chiwawa being busy with sculpting and he did not end until 8.00 pm.

Edward Chiwawa had also a trademark. He mostly sculpted  Moon heads, with  the same face. When he made a frame around the sculpture he called it a Sun head, always the same faces. He  also made a complete  ball with that face, and he called it Moon ball.

I bought two small sculptures made by Edward Chiwawa and he was so nice to add his signature under a stone . He was also willing to pose for a photo with me and my wife (Fig. 7)

m_IMG_8412-cs2

Fig. 7 Edward Chiwawa posing with me and my wife.

When I asked Edward Chiwawa  the titles of the stones we just had bought, I thought  he said Moonjets. When I told this to Mrs. José de Goede, she said “Edward doesn’t speak English very well, he means Moon heads”.

Below illustrations of the Sun- and Moon heads from Edward Chiwawa (Fig. 8a + 8b)

Unnamed image (75)

Fig. 8a Edward Chiwawa showing a Moon head

Unnamed image (71)

Fig. 8b Rising Sun Head, sculpted by Edward Chiwawa

Epilogue

So I will end my first impression of the start of my study of the Zimbabwean Stone Sculpture in the period 1950 – 1980. My paperwork will not be scientific, because I am not a scientist. But it will be an expression of my true believe in the development of African Art, especially stone sculpting, in a short period in Zimbabwe.

I will try to find out the  circumstances when this development took place and who were the participants taking  part in this. At the end I hope to get an answer about the question: “Was the Shona stone sculpting in Zimbabwe authentic and what was their value for the Art World”.

As I am prejudiced in favor of a positive answer on this question I will sometimes be  contrary to the common opinions of the scientists about this matter. I hope they do not mind it.

As Ambassador of the sculpture gallery Beeldentuin Maastricht – Heerdenerg I shall not hesitate to stipulate their role in the  development of the Zimbabwean stone sculpture.

Maastricht, February 16, 2015

Pierre Swillens

REFERENCE
Joosten, Ben
2001 Sculptors from Zimbabwe, the first generation, Galerie de Strang,

Sculptors from Zimbabwe (deel 5)

17 Sep

the first generation

Henry Munyaradzi

Inleiding

Wanneer je op internet iets leest over de Afrikaanse beeldhouwers in steen uit Zimbabwe, behorend tot ‘the first generation’ , dan wordt Henry Munyaradzi in een adem genoemd met Bernard Matemera, als behoiend tot de belangrijkste kunstenaars.
Bernard Matemera heb ik behandeld in de weblog ‘Sculptors from Zimbabwwe (deel 2)’. Het lijkt mij nu nuttig om de beurt te geven aan Henry Munyaradzi.

Necrologie van Henry Munyaradzi

spade_head
Henry Munyaradzi werd ook wel Henry Mzengerere genoemd, maar hij werd nog beter bekend onder de simpele naam Henry. Hiervan kreeg ik een bevestiging toen ik onlangs in de beeldentuin Maastricht-Heerdeberg sprak met McCloud Chiwawa. McCloud is de zoon van Edward Chiwawa, die momenteel ook in de beeldentuin aanwezig is.
Toen ik met McCloud sprak over Henry, toen wist hij precies waar ik over sprak. Henry was een neef van zijn vader en in het gezin van zijn vader opgegroeid.

Henry Munyaraqdzi was geboren in 1931 in Guruve in het noorden van Zimbabwe. Hij behoorde tot de Korekore stam. Zijn vader was een ‘spirit medium’ en hield zich dus bezig met de geesten van de voorvaderen. Hij bekommerde zich minder om zijn gezin en verliet dit toen Heny Munyaradzi nog jong was.
Door dit alles ging Henry Munyaradzi niet naar school en bracht hij zijn jeugd door met het hoeden van vee en het jagen op wild met honden, speer en pijl en boog.
Hij werd opgenomen in het gezin van zijn neef Edward Chiwawa. Toen hij ging werken, nam hij alles aan, zoals landarbeider, smid, timmerman en arbeider op een tabaksplantage.
Hij was inmiddels getrouwd en kreeg in totaal negen kinderen.

henry_munyaradszi
Toen hij in 1967 werkloos was, kwam hij in Tengenenge terecht en hij kwam daar voor het eerst in aanraking met het beeldhouwen in steen. Hij hoorde de kunstenaars kappen en raakte daardoor gefascineerd Tom Blomefield, waarover ik in een eerdere weblog reeds sprak, zag wel iets in hem en gaf hem een kans om zich aan te sluiten bij de Tengenenge Sculptor Community.
Henry Munyaradzi ging voortvarend aan de slag,  werkte volledig op zichzelf en slaagde erin om  op korte termijn een faam als kunstenaar te verwerven. In 1968 kreeg hij al een tentoonstelling van zijn werk in de National Gallery of Zimbabwe.

Henry Munyaradzi bleef tot 1975 in Tengenenge tot de grond onder zijn voeten daar te heet werd door de woedende burgeroorlog tussen het regeringsleger en twee Afrikaanse bevrijdingslegers. Hij vertrok met zijn gezin naar Chitungwiza waar ook zijn neef Edward Chiwawa en Faizani Akuda waren neergestreken.

Na het beëindigen van de oorlog in 1980 keerde hij niet terug naar Tengenenge. Wel kocht hij in 1985 een boerderij in Ruwa, alwaar hij tot zijn dood in 1998 verbleef.

Werken van Henry Munyaradzi

In de beginjaren van zijn carrière beperkte Henry Munyaradzi zich tot het kappen van kleinere beelden met ronde vormen. Hij gebruikte veel zwarte serpentijnsteen en werkte zijn beelden volledig af (zie foto A).
Over het algemeen kapte hij beelden met weinig details. Het was alsof vorm en expressie moest uitdragen, wat hij met het beeld bedoelde.
In 1986 kapte hij een groot beeld in ‘springstone’ (zie foto C).

Later ging Henry Munyaradzi over tot het gebruik van plattere stenen, waarbij hij de vorm van de steen meestal intact liet. Bovendien kapte hij met incisies en weinig details. Hij werd dan ook vergeleken met het werk van Paul Klee, ofschoon hij nooit van deze gehoord zal hebben (zie foto B).

Epiloog

Henry Munyaradzi is een duidelijke exponent van de Shona cultuur. Ongeschoold met een moeilijke jeugd en allerlei baantjes slaagt hij erin om, volkomen autodidactisch, een gerespecteerd kunstenaar te worden binnen ‘the first generation’ van beeldhouwers in steen in Zimbabwe.

Pierre Swillens

De foto’s A, B en C zijn gescand uit het boek ‘Sculptors from Zimbabwe’, geschreven door Ben Joosten.

Foto A

Henry Munyaradzi aan het begin van zijn carrière (1972).

Afbeelding6a
Foto B
Henry Munyaradzi op latere leeftijd met het beeld ‘the wedding of the astronauts’ (1994).

Afbeelding8a
Foto C
Heny Munyaradzi maakt dit beeld ‘Mhondoro -great lion spirit’ in 1986. Het gebruikte materiaal is het harde ‘springstone’. Het beeld maakt nu deel uit van de collectie in Chapungu Sculpture Park in Harare.

Afbeelding9a

Fotogalerij

Sculptors from Zimbabwe (deel 4)

24 Aug

the first generation

een gevoelig verlies

Inleiding

Op 5 februari 2011 plaatste José de Goede op haar weblog een bericht met als kop: ‘Onze lieve kunstenaar Fanizani Akuda is vanmorgen overleden’. Daarbij plaatste ze onderstaande foto. José heeft kennelijk vaak contact gehad met Fanizani Akuda. Met een respect dat wederzijds gold, want Fanizani Akuda bewaarde mooie beelden voor haar, als ze weer eens inkopen deed in Zimbabwe.

De mens Fanizani Akuda intrigeerde mij en het leek mij een uitstekend idee om met hem de serie ‘Sculptors from Zimbabwe’ af te sluiten. Temeer omdat Fanizani Akuda een van de representanten van ‘the first generation’ van de beeldhouwers in steen van Zimbabwe was.

Foto A
José bezoekt de familie Akuda in Zimbabwe.

akuda-3
Necrologie van Fanizani Akuda

akuda-1

 

Traditioneel gebruik ik als voornaamste bron: Sculptors from Zimbabwe, geschreven door Ben Joosten. Hier en daar aangevuld met wetenswaardigheden, die ik op internet tegenkwam.

Fanizani Akuda werd in 1932 geboren in Zambia. Hij behoorde tot de Chewa stam. In 1949 ging hij voor werk naar Guruve in Zimbabwe. Hij nam alle werk aan, dat zich voordeed,  en was achtereenvolgens katoenplukker, korvenvlechter en baksteenvormer.

In 1967 kwam hij terecht bij Tom Blomefield, die net met zijn Tengenenge Sculpture Community was begonnen. Fanizani Akuda moest er voor zorgen, dat de kunstenaars over stenen konden beschikken om deze te bewerken. De stenen waren in een nabije mijn voldoende voorhanden.
Tom Blomefield vroeg hem om ook te gaan beeldhouwen, maar daar trok Fanizani Akuda niet aan, want hij was bang, dat hij bij het kappen steensplinters in zijn ogen kon krijgen.

Kennelijk heeft hij zich later bedacht, want toen een van de kunstenaars uit de Community vertrok, vroeg Fanizani Akuda aan Tom Blomefield of hij de vrijgevallen plaats mocht innemen. Tom Blomefield had hier al rekening mee gehouden, want het gereedschap, dat de kunstenaar had achtergelaten, werd aan Fanizani Akuda overhandigd.

akuda-4Fanizani Akuda bleek inderdaad over talenten voor het beeldhouwen in steen te beschikken en ontwikkelde zich al snel tot een succesvol kunstenaar. Tot 1979 bleef hij in Tengenenge. Toen werd de situatie ter plaatse gevaarlijk door de uitgebroken bevrijdingsoorlog. Tengenenge werd zelfs gesloten.

Met Tom Blomefield en een aantal kunstenaars vertrok hij naar Harare. Na het einde van de bevrijdingsoorlog (1980) hervatte Tom Blomefield in Tengenenge de Sculpture Community. Hij vroeg Fanizani Akuda om naar Tengenenge terug te keren, maar deze weigerde. Zijn kinderen gingen in Harare naar school en hij was bezig om er een nieuwe vrienden- en relaties-kring op te bouwen.
Fanizani Akuda kon van het beeldhouwen leven. Hij ging in Chitungwiza wonen (tevens de woonplaats van Edward Chiwawa). Hij woonde royaal, maar verlangde wel eens eens naar Tengenenge, omdat hij daar meer ruimte had voor zijn beelden en onbewerkte stenen, terwijl de stenen daar rijkelijk voorhanden waren.

Fanizani Akuda was een echte familieman. Hij had met zijn vrouw Erina zeven kinderen. Hij stond erop, dat deze kinderen een goede schoolopleiding kregen. Hijzelf had er altijd spijt van gehad, dat hij maar een beperkte schoolopleiding had genoten.

Op 5 februari 2011 kwam een einde aan zijn werkzaam leven.

Foto B
Fanizani Akuda met zijn vrouw Erina en het beeld ‘Whistler’

akuda-2

Beelden van Fanizani Akuda

happy_family

 

Fanizani Akuda’s stijl onderscheidde zich doordat hij zijn beelden volledig afwerkte, nergens was de steen nog ruw of ongepolijst. Vaak zag je dat hij twee hoofden naast of boven elkaar beitelde. Daarin zag je de vorm van de steen, die hij bewerkt had.

Zoals gezegd, was Fanizani Akuda een familieman. Het beeld op foto A en op de foto, waarop hij met hetzelfde beeld staat, was volgens hem een zelfportret van hemzelf en van zijn vrouw. Hij noemde het beeld ‘Always Together’

Het beeld hierboven noemde hij ‘Happy Family’ en dit had zeer zeker met zijn familie te maken.

Wanneer hij gezichten in zijn beelden maakte, dan hadden deze ronde ogen met in het midden een smalle streep. De ogen waren volgens hem gesloten, omdat de beelden bang waren, dat er bij het kappen steensplinters in hun ogen kwamen. Kennelijk baseerde hij zich hierbij op zijn eigen ervaring.

In het begin hadden zijn beelden met gezichten nog een smalle mond, maar later vormde hij de mond via een boorgat. Hij noemde die beelden ‘Whistler’ of  ‘Whistling Head’.

Op foto B zie je een beeld ‘Whistler’, dat hem kennelijk dierbaar was, want hij hield het in zijn eigen collectie.

whistling_man

 

 

Naarmate hij ouder werd, namen zijn krachten af en maakte hij geen grote beelden meer. Hij beperkte zich voornamelijk tot ‘Whistlers’. Het woord ‘flierefluiter’ zal hij wel niet gekend hebben, maar die intentie voor zijn beelden had hij wel.  Hij was niet van humor gespeend en verwachtte, dat als je met je duim over het boorgat streek er een geluid uit kwam. Zo had ieder beeld zijn eigen geluid.
Het verhaal over het strijken met de duim over het boorgat vond ik op de website http://www.friendsforeverzimbabwe.com. Fanizani Akuda behoorde tot de Friends Forever, dus het waarheidsgehalte kan groot zijn. Om de gegevens van Fanizani Akuda te vinden, klik op de genoemde website op de button ‘Artists’ en zoek naar de naam Fanizani Akuda. Dat zal niet zo moeilijk zijn, want die staat als eerste.

Aan het beeld hierboven zie je, hoe de vorm van de onbewerkte steen er oorspronkelijk heeft uitgezien.

Epiloog

m_IMG_8373-cs2Ook nu nog is er een ‘Whistler’ van Fanizani Akuda in de beeldentuin Maastricht-Heerdeberg te bewonderen. Ik wil dan ook eindigen met een foto van dit beeld. De fluiter heeft bolle wangen van het fluiten.

Zodra ik er weer kom, dan zal ik zeker over het boorgat strijken om te horen wat voor geluid dit beeld maakt.

 

 

Jammer dat Fanizani Akuda er geen beelden meer aan kan toevoegen.

Bekijk ook onderstaande fotogalerij.

Pierre Swillens

 

Fotogalerij